lb_lee: A happy little brain with a bandage on it, surrounded by a circle and the words LB Lee. (Default)
[personal profile] lb_lee
There is a chestnut of misinformation on tumblr claiming that 'system' is a term made by DID folks, for DID folks, and nobody else is allowed to use it.  This is often wrapped up in the idea that multiplicity is owned by people with DID/DDNOS/OSDD, and anyone else claiming it is appropriating.  This is utter nonsense.  I've written numerous posts on this before, but here is the more thorough breakdown, first focused on the politics of this statement, and then the actual facts of reality.

The Politics: why this argument doesn't make sense, even under its own logic. )

The Facts: twenty-plus years of non-DID multiples using 'system.' )
dhampyresa: (SCIENCE SMASH)
[personal profile] dhampyresa
Thank you for writing for me! I'm sure whatever you write me will be wonderful.

Feel free to poke around this journal or my Ao3 account (username: [archiveofourown.org profile] sevenofspade ) if you want to. My letters tag is here.

I have six Do Not Wants: allegory/metaphor of real world politics, incest, rape, child abuse, character death and dysphoria. When these are canon, please don't focus on them. I would also prefer not to have to deal with people losing things important to them and toxic living arrangements, be that family or roomates. Thank you.

On the other hand, there are a lot of things I do want. Here’s a partial list. (I obviously don’t expect you to stick all of these in one story, that would be impossible.)

General likes )

Feel free to take prompts in whichever direction you like! And if none of my prompts work for you, then write whatever you want -- I'll be happy with anything.  (I request fanfiction only because while I really really love art, I don't know how to prompt for it.)


My theme this year is "female mad scientists" (for given values of "mad", "scientist" and "mad scientist"), but please don't feel as though mad science has to be the be-all and end-all of what you make me.


Campaign (Podcast) (Lyntel'luroon (Star Wars: Campaign Podcast))

I am up to date on the show and will remain so. Feel free to set things at any time in canon or pre-canon or post-canon (or in a canon-divergent AU).

I ship Lyn with just about everyone female in the galaxy far far away (Lyn/Avaa! Lyn/Fentara! Lyn/Vous-vous!), but I think my favourite relationship is her mentoring Tamlin.

Lyn going on more archeology adventures. Lyn backstory (with the band or not). Lyn future-fic (with her future-wife?) -- what will Lyn do once she's collected the entire Journal of the Whills?


Critical Role (Web Series) (Anna Ripley, Raishan (Critical Role) )

I'm not (yet) up to date on the show, but I am caught up on everything involving both Ripley and Raishan and don't mind spoilers. Feel free to set things at any time in canon or pre-canon or post-canon (or in a canon-divergent AU).

I ship both of them with Percy and Keyleth -- not necessarily all at once! But if you want to write Ripley/Percy/Keyleth/Raishan, that would be amazing -- and with each other. Female mad scientists in love!

I'd love to read about Ripley's quest for the Vestiges or how and why she mad her deal with Orthax or Ripley (+ the Briarwoods?) backstory.

What was Raishan's plan to deal with Thordak without Vox Machina? Raishan vs Vecna! (I'm not a big fan of Raishan-pretending-to-be-Assum, btw.)


DC Cinematic Universe
(Isabel Maru (DC Cinematic Universe) )

Wonder Woman is the only movie I have seen in the DC Cinematic Universe, but I don't mind spoilers for the others. Feel free to set things at any time in the movie or pre-movie or post-movie (or in a canon-divergent AU).

I want to know all about how Dr Maru was able to have notes on Uunhexium in (mostly) Neo-Assyrian Cuneiform. I totally ship her with Diana, btw. Post-movie shipfic?


Marvel 616 (Valeria Richards (Marvel 616) )

I've read most of the comics involving her. Her age/timeline is a bit of a mess, so feel free to set things whenever and make her whatever age you want.

I would love to see her bond with her godfather, Victor von Doom -- or with Verity Willis (Val was adorable in Agent of Asgard). Something set during Secret Wars would be great. BUILDING MORE FANNISH STUFF LIKE LIGHTSABERS! (Valeria vs fandom?


Voltron: Legendary Defender (Haggar (VLD) )

I am up to date on the show and will remain so. Feel free to set things at any time in canon or pre-canon or post-canon (or in a canon-divergent AU).

Ship-wise, I like Haggar/Allura, Haggar/Pidge and Haggar/Shiro and I'm intrigued by Haggar/Zarkon. I have no opinion on whether or not she is Lotor's mom or not (she could be Keith's mom, though, that'd be amazing).

Haggar is the mad scientist/space witch mash-up of my heart. I would love to know about how she structures her experiments, being a druid-engineer. Something where she's a double agent would be very interesting as would anything about her 10 000+ years of life -- what's it like living that long?

Thank you again for making something for me! (Comments welcome.)

I WIN AT THE REMIX!

Sep. 17th, 2017 11:40 pm
dhampyresa: (Epic shit happening on the internet)
[personal profile] dhampyresa
Underworld (the Etruscan pottery remix) (5 words) by Anonymous
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Etruscan Mythology
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Original Female Character/Original Female Character
Characters: Original Female Character(s), Vanth (Etruscan Mythology), Karun (Etruscan Mythology), Tuchulcha (Etruscan Mythology)
Additional Tags: Digital Art, Fanart, Etruscan mythology - Freeform, Red-figure vase painting, Underworld
Summary:

"I could not leave you here alone," Thana said.
Velia folded her hands over Thana's. "I wanted you to live, my love."
"I know," Thana said. "But I could not leave you here."


For Jukebox 2016 I wrote A penny for the ferryman, a story in which a woman journeys through the Etruscan underworld to rescue her ladylove. It's inspired by both Nightwish's Planet Hell (which gives it its title) and Etruscan mythology -- especially the figure of Vanth, who I find fascinating.

SOMEONE ILLUSTRATED IT IN THE STYLE OF RED-FIGURE POTTERY PAINTING :DDDDDDD It looks so great. SO GREAT. There are so many cool details!

Changing our Internet Usage

Sep. 17th, 2017 12:33 pm
lb_lee: A picture of Sneak smiling (sneak)
[personal profile] lb_lee
Hello!  It's Sneak!  I was thinking about an article that [personal profile] metahacker linked, this one about designing sites addictively.  And it's made me get on board with Mac and Biff's idea about changing how we interact with the Internet!

Namely: we will be deleting our Facebook, and drastically cutting down our tumblr time (if not ending it entirely).

But my reasons for it aren't the same as theirs.  Biff just doesn't like the Internet in general, and Mac noticed that it wasn't making us happy.  Rogan has said he finds internet stuff increasingly overwhelming, and I think I know why: the newer generation of social media sites are designed for constant interaction.

We grew up in an older Internet time, where you weren't expected to be online every day.  You could take a break for a week, and quickly catch up, no problem!  Forums, DeviantArt, Livejournal, all of these sites are (or were) not intended to be used multiple times a day, every day. (Unless you're a HARDCORE user.) The sites were also designed for specific things: to make posts, or put up art.  They weren't expected to be everything for everyone, and while DeviantArt had forums and chatrooms, you could do perfectly fine without them. (And I don't think the chatrooms were there when we first joined.)

However, as time has gone on and more folks are on the Internet more often, these sites have changed their design philosophy.  Instead of being made for folks to interact maybe a few times a week, they're now made to be posted on multiple times a day for long stretches.  They're also more generalized.  For instance, Facebook was originally intended for folks applying for college, or in college; now it's used to organize offline events and work engagements, catch up with people from your past, and have heated political arguments.  It has groups, events, chats, games, individual pages, all with very questionable security and ethics, and they sell the information for profit.

I don't think it's paranoid to say that a site like Facebook designs itself to be as omnipresent as possible so they can get as much information (and therefore as much profit) as they can from their users!  But I can say that it makes the site not a lot of fun to be on, for us anyway.  Even the nicest site in the world would get overwhelming and tiresome when you're encouraged to be there all the time!  And by trying to be everything for everyone, their designs tend to fall apart, because they're trying to do so many things at the same time.  So it becomes awfully byzantine (in the case of Facebook) or just plain incoherent and broken (like tumblr)!

Arguments and conflict happen on every website.  But when a site is designed to be used all the time, the rate of interaction as high as possible, then it means that instead of seeing conflict maybe once a month, you see it all the time, and that's its own kind of draining!  On the whole, I think that we are just not able to keep up with sites like that, and that it's bad for our health to try.

In other words, it's time to refocus our online energy to websites that are designed for fewer, more specific interactions!  Therefore, I personally vote in agreement for deleting our Facebook, continuing our low/no tumblr usage, and refocusing our attention on sites like Dreamwidth.

--Sneak

Queer Crip Pride shirts!

Sep. 16th, 2017 02:16 pm
lb_lee: A picture of Sneak smiling (sneak)
[personal profile] lb_lee
Hey guys, did you love the gorgeous textures and typography for our covers of the Homeless Year and Alter Boys In Love?  Awesome news, the designer friend who did those is now selling awesome queer disability pride shirts!  We're planning on buying the purple one with the pink 'disability pride' letters.

Also there's a sale going for about nine more hours, so snatch one on the cheap!

Woo, T-shirts!

--Sneak and Mori

Derek Jarman's The Last of England

Sep. 16th, 2017 03:46 am
rushthatspeaks: (altarwise)
[personal profile] rushthatspeaks
Derek Jarman is probably my favorite film director-- the only serious competition is Ulrike Ottinger-- and in several of his books he speaks about The Last of England (1987) as his masterpiece, which of course means it's the one of his films that is impossible to get for love or money, especially if you live in the U.S..

The Brattle just screened it as part of their currently ongoing Tilda Swinton festival. Tilda Swinton, very young at the time, turned out to play England. (I probably should have expected that, but somehow I didn't.)*

He was quite right about it being a masterpiece, and, again as I should have expected from Jarman, it has had me thinking very hard about the nature and purpose of art ever since.

The Last of England is definitely a movie. It's a post-apocalyptic dystopia shot entirely using the decay of the civil infrastructure present in Thatcher's England, and I could identify a narrative-- a pair of brothers, one of whom is subverted by his attempts to subvert a balaclava-wearing, machine-gun-toting agent of the state, so that their romance causes him to wind up in a mask with a gun himself, and the other of whom winds up shot by said state agents-- and there are a lot of interesting allusions to other works of art (the opening narration at one point quotes Howl and then veers crashingly into T. S. Eliot in what is either complete literary blasphemy or the way that line was always meant to end, possibly both).** There's a year-king thing, kind of, except he doesn't get up again, and the childhood of the brothers is portrayed using home videos from Jarman's own childhood, which is fascinating because his parents were among the latest chronologically of the dyed-in-the-wool servants of the British Raj and it shows. There's a vitriolic intellectual critique of just about everything about the concepts "England" and "British".

But the thing that had me reeling and trying desperately mentally to cope is that above all, and with absolute intentionality, The Last of England is not a movie. It is a curse.

I have spent a lot of time considering evil and its relationship, if any, to art, because I try to create art myself and I feel it is a responsible thing for any artist to consider. I could get into a long digression about what I believe about evil and what I don't, but suffice it to say I do believe in evil, and the principle way I have seen evil interact with art is that subset of art which actively attempts to harm the audience, for no reason other than that it can. That sort of art can do a great deal of damage, if one runs into it at the wrong time. The other major way I have seen evil interact with art is art that is promulgating an ideology of evil, a set of beliefs which make the world decidedly worse, such as the racism of D. W. Griffith's Birth of a Nation.

I had never contemplated what I would think of a piece of art which is definitively opposed to an evil ideology-- Thatcherism, fascism, totalitarianism-- and which is doing everything in its power to harm, to hurt, to wreak havoc on, to destroy, and, if possible, to damn in the Biblical sense-- a set of people who are not the viewer.

When I say curse I mean it in a very old way. I mean that Derek Jarman was a great scholar, and he knew more about sixteenth- and seventeenth-century magic and alchemy than most academics, and he knew more about English witch-lore than any other authority I have ever encountered. And I don't know nearly as much about either as he did, but I know enough that this movie consistently raised the hairs on the back of my neck. I am... not quite sure that there is an attempt in and by this film to summon a specifically demonic presence. They may have been aiming for neutral. Or for angelic, and... missed, but I doubt that. I don't mean summoning in an obvious way, it's not like there are pentagrams on the floor, quite. It's done with light and fire and movement and the visual invocation of archetypes. It's done with dance and cross-dressing and other very careful costume.

And it's the precise kind of anger and pain turned into hatred that would cause a pastor to make serious inquiries as to the state of one's soul, and which might cause less theologically minded persons to mutter things about the abyss gazing back. Which is a concern Jarman eyes, and then discards, because this ideology, this thing that had happened to England under the rule of Thatcher and those around her, was to him worth that kind of hatred. And I think he came out of it all right as a human being and an artist himself, because he was objectively correct about that. But possibly only because he was objectively correct about that. The anger and pain and hatred here were so lacerating, so gorgeously done, so implacable and so beautiful that I kept wanting to hide, and it wasn't even aimed at me, he kept throwing in things to remind the audience that it isn't directed at us and honestly that does not help all that much.

Because with that sort of curse witnessing it is part of what drives it and makes it active.

I spent much of the film with some part of my mind trying to figure out if I thought it was moral to do this, to make this thing. Then I came down firmly and forever on the side that it is, because Tilda Swinton came in and played England.

We initially see Swinton's character in the memories of the one of the brothers who gets executed. She's wearing a sundress, and she's sitting in a field full of so many daffodils that it cannot read as naturalistic, even though, unlike most of the rest of the movie, the scene is shot in natural colors. She's his idealized love, that he won't ever be coming back to, and she's England itself, in both nurturing and colonialist aspects. "Don't be sad," we hear her say matter-of-factly as the bullets strike him: John Barleycorn is, after all, dead. She comes in next in full wedding dress and bridal veil, surrounded by attendants who are large and burly men dressed pretty much as Marie Antoinette, wedding a placeholder of a groom (the camera never focuses on his face) in a burned-out, rubble-strewn wreck of an industrial hangar. No dialogue, just the movements of the wedding, jerky smiles, everyone congratulating everybody else, Swinton eying a pram with an odd mixture of fear and longing. Earlier iconography has made it clear that the pram, though it does, of course, represent a baby, should also be taken to represent not a baby, but a cathexis of other ideas around fear and change and darkness.

And then we cut to Tilda Swinton outside, alone, by the water, by what looks like an industrial canal. There's a fire burning in an oil barrel next to her, a bonfire. She has scissors, and she tries to hack her way out of the wedding dress. It does not want to go. (It's really a lovely dress, by the way, in legitimately good taste, with about sixteen layers of veiling.) She rips at it with her fingers. She claws. She bites off parts of it. And these motions, without ever quite ceasing, turn themselves into a dance.

A line from a short story by Tanith Lee was running through my head during this scene, and it's still the only thing that comes to mind as anything resembling an adequate description: "... when she danced, a gate seemed to open in the world, and bright fire spangled inside it, but she was the fire."***

Have you ever seen something so transcendentally beautiful that you don't know how to think about it?

It's not just that this is the best thing Tilda Swinton has ever done on film, though it is, by such a distance that it's difficult to fathom. It's that I suspect it's one of the best things anyone has ever done on film. I am not exaggerating. Watching it is the kind of experience where you don't come away as exactly the same person.

Which she did, in full knowledge, in the service of Derek Jarman's curse.

All right, then. I consider it a moral action. Those few minutes are, by themselves, sufficient justification, and I don't see how the two of them, Jarman and Swinton, Tilda and Derek, could possibly have produced those few minutes out of hatred unless the hatred itself-- well-- to some degree contained within it all of that. Magical curses are, all the books say, perilous things, liable to come back on the caster unless their motives are completely pure. I have to take that dance as demonstration of impeccably pure motivations. I can't see what else it could be.

There are a lot of interesting things about this movie that I haven't even mentioned, of course. I finally understand why Jarman hated Peter Greenaway so much, because it turns out that for Prospero's Books, years later on, Greenaway swiped the aesthetic of some bits at the beginning of this movie that are set in Jarman's actual house and have Jarman playing himself. In fact, Greenaway even swiped Jarman's handwriting for use in his page overlays on the screen. I can see being upset by that. I would have been, too.

And there's the way almost all of the soundtrack is classical, except when it very much isn't. And the way that Jarman on several occasions intercuts between two separate scenes so quickly that persistence of vision forces you to believe that you are somehow watching both of them at the same time (well, and you get rather nauseated, which I don't think could be helped). And there's a scene with a man eating a cauliflower that totally defies all description; never had I imagined such a thing could be done with an innocent cruciferous vegetable. It's not remotely sexual. I'd almost prefer if it was.

But I've summed up the major things I've been pondering since watching the movie, and also it's five in the morning, so. A masterpiece. You should absolutely see it. But be wary.






* It occurs to me only now, writing this, that Swinton's role as both an allegorical England and a theoretically real young woman is an homage to Anna Magnani's stunning performance as the city of Rome in Pier Paolo Pasolini's Mamma Roma (1962). Somehow, all of the critical writing I have encountered on Mamma Roma fails to realize that she is the entire city incarnate and it gets shoved in with Pasolini's Neo-Realist period, which I am starting to think he never actually had. But I digress.

** I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness starving hysterical naked not with a bang but with a whimper

*** From Tanith Lee's "When The Clock Strikes". Worth noting that the character described has sold herself to Satan, and is also the agent of promulgating a curse.

Fox update

Sep. 15th, 2017 02:30 am
rushthatspeaks: (parenting)
[personal profile] rushthatspeaks
At one day shy of eleven months, Fox is definitely both walking and talking.

Over the last few weeks, the walking has gone from very determined cruising to one or two steps without falling down to chains of three or four steps connected by moments of serious arm waving, or squatting and standing back up again. They don't really fall down at all, and never have, but they would sometimes cease forward motion. Now we've just gotten to walking across a room, and I haven't seen them crawl in several days. They also climb much better-- can get onto the back rail of the futon, or actively pull themself up onto my shoulder when I'm sitting on the futon. They don't seem to distinguish yet between standing on/climbing on somebody and standing on/climbing on inanimate objects. We need to give them a real shot at stairs sometime here, as there aren't any in our house and they could probably use the practice.

The talking... I guess many people's first words are... more readily distinguishable? I mean, either Fox has been talking for like a week, or Fox has been talking since about April, and I legitimately do not know. They've been saying 'Hiiiiii' to people all along, literally since birth, and they've been saying 'Ma! Ma!' to Ruth and 'Da! Da!' to me and 'At! At!' to the cats for some months, but they also said those syllables to things that aren't me or Ruth or the cats. I just wasn't able to tell babble from intentional speech, and I don't really think there was a way to.

However, what we're getting now is Fox saying 'Ma! Ma!' at Ruth in the morning when they want Ruth to get out of bed and feed them, which is pretty clearly intentional, and they say 'At!' when they see a picture of a cat in any of their books. (I haven't seen them hold a book upside down in a couple of weeks, either. Something about pictures has clicked.) Also today they hugged me and then put the final d on 'Dad' for the first time, which was just as heart-melting as I could possibly have imagined. We've also had 'Es' for a while, which means general agreement, though, and this fascinates me, we have nothing even vaguely resembling no as a word, just yelling. And 'Ba' means ball or book, but 'Ba' in a different tone means bottle; I can't really duplicate this but can hear the difference clearly.

I haven't heard them babble any of the phonemes yet that would allow them to use the names of various grandparents or their third parent, and we're all actually pretty sure they consider their third parent's name too hard right now, given the timing of various looks of frustration.

Their favorite toy right now is the photo album Ruth got them with pictures of extended family, friends, and various significant occasions in their own life, which they will pore over with devoted concentration for long stretches of time. They haven't liked an object so much since they first noticed their mobile at five months. Sometimes we'll go through and say again who various people are and what the event was, though I have no idea if they remotely have or can have the idea yet of a picture of themself.

They do have the idea now of doorknobs, but not the reach. I have seen them try to follow somebody out the door by going over and batting at the knob from below. So far they are about as good at this as our smarter cat, and I devoutly hope those two never team up. I will also be shocked if Fox doesn't start climbing over baby gates rather sooner than us parent-types would like, although at least we have one more level to lower their mattress inside its enclosure if they start getting out of their bed anytime soon.

Solid food clicked some while back, and while they're still having four or five large bottles a day, they also eat two or three solid meals, things like mango puree, applesauce, avocado, yogurt, Cheerios, and/or semisolid oat cereal. Sometimes we mix some of those together. We also give them bits of what we're eating, though we're trying to avoid large quantities of sugar and salt till they're past a year old. They have two and a half teeth, the bottom front two and one I think I see lurking partially emerged in the back bottom left. They can drink through a straw, and they can drink from a sippy cup and, actually, from a regular cup, though I don't let them very often because after they drink from it they'll just toss it down like they do the bottle.

We have never cut their hair, because that's a decision they'll be able to make for themself in not all that long, so they strongly resemble a Beatle, or possibly an emo rocker circa 2004. Putting a barrette across the bangs works until they take it out and try to eat it. Pigtails actually work but are not remotely my aesthetic preference. Fortunately they don't seem to mind hair in their face-- I've never seen them push at it or get frustrated with it.

Ruth took them to a baby swimming class over at MIT for a while, so we now have some notion of how to work with a swim diaper and how to interact with an infant in the water, which is great because we're going to the beach next month.

And their first birthday approaches apace, though milestone-wise-- toddler. I'd say we have a toddler.

Trick or Treat Exchange

Sep. 14th, 2017 05:10 pm
rachelmanija: (Default)
[personal profile] rachelmanija
For those who don't know, Trick or Treat is a fun, low-pressure fic and art fest - the minimum is only 300 words! Treating is encouraged. Signups are open now. You can see the tagset of available fandoms here.

Treats (and tricks) in unrequested but known-to-be-favorite fandoms/characters of mine are always welcome!

My god, this is long. Sorry!

My fandoms are The Darkangel, The Dark Tower (book), The Girl With the Silver Eyes, Hamilton, Ladyhawke, The Magnificent Seven (2016), Marvel 616 (aka X-Men comics), Saiyuki, The Stand, and The Windsingers.

Prompts below cut. Read more... )

IT'S SEPTEMBER FFS

Sep. 14th, 2017 10:54 pm
dhampyresa: (Default)
[personal profile] dhampyresa
I can't believe there's yuletide wank already and I haven't even signed up for Trick or Treat yet. Damn. I also need to nom some stuff for yuletide, because apparently noms are open now? What even. I finished the last of the mirabelles yesterday (this is when summer ends, for me) and yuletide noms were already open?! THE FUCK

I will sign up for Trick or Treat (I have decided that this year I am requesting all female mad scientists) and nom stuff for yuletide, just... not right now.

I honestly don't feel up to much besides watching stuff right now. I started by catching up on shows I was behind on (Orphan Black, Cleverman, Still Star-Crossed), then moved on to Vatican Miracle Examiner, then to Wynonna Earp. To give you an idea, I started Wynonna Earp on Tuesday and I've finished S1 today. I am doing nothing but watching TV. It's weird. I am very grateful to everyone who recced me stuff.

(no subject)

Sep. 14th, 2017 05:27 pm
violsva: A graffiti white maple leaf surrounding the words Toronto Maple Waffles (toronto maple waffles)
[personal profile] violsva
So I’ve been sketching a lot recently.

And one of the things I’ve noticed, and that I remember, is an extreme reluctance to keep going sometimes. When you’ve drawn something that looks perfect to you, you start getting worried that anything else you do is going to ruin what you have so far. This leg is perfect, what if I can’t get the body right. Or even worse, this arm is perfect except that it’s too small for the rest of the body, and it needs to be done again. Now what?

It’s a disbelief in one’s ability to replicate one’s own work. You can’t just erase it and draw another one, or flip the page and try again, because that one won’t be as good.

Ursula Vernon talks about giving yourself permission to make bad art, because that’s the only way you learn. That applies to writing as well, and I have practice with letting myself write badly. But this doesn’t apply, quite, because there’s no way you’ll ruin already-written prose. You might end up with nowhere to put it in your story, but you’re not going to make it worse. Everything is fixable after the fact. Drawing, even in pencil, feels a lot more immutable.

But the thing about drawing, which helps, is that there is no way to get better except to practice. (And reading art books and looking at other art, sure. But that doesn’t actually improve, for example, your fine motor skills.) And that half-done sketch where I eventually gave up because her shoulders looked wrong is still practice, and the one that looks perfect except that the head is way too small is still practice, and my utter and repeated failure to draw cats is still practice. And if I had kept going and erased the shoulders and redrawn them, that would just have been more practice. More practice is good.

The other thing for me, though, is that I don’t actually want to be sketching. I want to paint. But (until the bank actually does their job) I don’t have paints. I have pencils and notebooks, so dammit, I’m doing this instead. So that makes it easier to accept that it’s not going to be perfect.

Back from Texas!

Sep. 13th, 2017 02:29 pm
lb_lee: Miranda saying "REALITY" with airquotes. (realitylolz)
[personal profile] lb_lee
Hello all!  As you can see, we've returned from our trip, and it wasn't as bad as Mori feared.  We're rather tired, but I'll give the quick sum-up!
  • The con went very well.  The entire trip cost us less than thirty dollars, thanks to Rogan selling well.  Huzzah!
  • We took all the photographs we needed of our childhood neighborhood, and I daresay we are now prepared for future comics set there.  Well done, dears! (However, we did not get to visit Candle Cave.  That's all right, Biff got a good hike, and regardless, we went in presuming it would be a bonus, not a given.)
  • We got to see some people of our past, including a couple high school friends, and Dr. Drag. (Dr. Drag was our first therapist, though we have not had that sort of relationship in years.  She has mentions on this blog, probably buried under the 'therapy' tag.) Their generosity allowed us to make this trip, and we are very grateful.
  • Rogan finished Alter Boys In Love, but due to the printer's website being broken on Mozilla and some truly peculiar requests regarding our formatting, we have not managed to finish the order.  We hope to complete that today.
  • Due to the intense work schedule, and the emotional challenge of returning to our hometown, Rogan has been worn out.  He will not be fronting for a bit, and Mori, Biff, Sneak, and I will manage things until he has rested up.

Thank you for your patience!
--Miranda

Trailer for The Disaster Artist

Sep. 12th, 2017 05:18 pm
rachelmanija: (Timbuktu to Uttar Pradesh)
[personal profile] rachelmanija
If the movie is like the trailer, this may be the most perfect adaptation ever made. Oh hai Mark.

holy fuck

Sep. 10th, 2017 01:34 am
rushthatspeaks: (signless: be that awesome)
[personal profile] rushthatspeaks
Okay, I have to link to the most impressive human feat of anything I've seen in quite a while:

A Delta flight successfully makes the NYC-San Juan-NYC run in the teeth of Hurricane Irma.

They flew out between the arm of the hurricane and the body of the storm. Intentionally. Because their dispatching called it correctly. The flight spent only fifty-two minutes on the ground at SJU, and left fully loaded.

There are some pilots, ground crew, dispatchers, and tower staff there who I devoutly hope never have to buy their own drinks in a bar ever again. I would not have believed that was possible.

Things must have been extremely tense for the ticketed passengers; it takes some guts to get on a plane that's pulling that kind of maneuver. Whoof.

Keeping track

Sep. 9th, 2017 11:22 pm
dhampyresa: (Default)
[personal profile] dhampyresa
Swimming: Haven't swam in about a month, so taking it slow for the pick-back.
Session total: 1 600m. Past total: 42 050 / 585 689. Current total: 43 650 / 585 689

I wonder if keeping track of what I draw every week (short summaries, like "profile headshot" or "1/3 of a watercolour" or whatever) would help me draw less headshots.

Kaamelott

Sep. 7th, 2017 11:50 pm
dhampyresa: Paris coat of arms: Gules, on waves of the sea in base a ship in full sail Argent, a chief Azure semé-de-lys Or (fluctuat nec mergitur)
[personal profile] dhampyresa
Given that the Kaamelott movie(s) are happening supposedly sometime soon, I decided I was going to rewatch the whole series. That turned out to be more of a watch than a rewatch, because while I'd seen some of the first four seasons I had seen pretty much nothing of the last two.

So. Kaamelott is a French TV show that's a retelling of the Arthurian legend, in which dealing with the Knights of the Round Table is worse than herding cats. It starts as comedy 3m30 shorts and turns into a 45m episodes drama for s5 and s6. It's got six seasons, it ends in an awful cliffhanger (Arthur's destitute and suicidal in Rome, Lancelot is ruling the kingdom and burning the Round Table) and has been left on this cliffhanger since 2009. Mind you, that's still a better cliffhanger to leave things on than the one at the end of s5.

Plot summary by season )

It's not a perfect show and sometimes it is very much of its time, but it's frequently hilarious, Arthur is the most relatable of the Arthurs and the cinematography is always gorgeous. Also, you can see both the budget increases and where the money went from season to season.

In case you were wondering, yes, there are times where I went "THAT'S NOT HOW ARTHURIANA WORKS", but for the most part it's cool.

The show feels a lot like some guy got his friends and family together to work on his passion project and somehow they landed both a budget and national airtime (on M6 -- this show lead to so many French memes, you guys. SO MANY), probably because it kind of is. The guy who plays Arthur is also the scenarist, the producer, the video editor, the composer and the interpreter for the music. He may also have other roles, idk. When did he sleep. (He is also related to a not inconsequential chunk of the cast.)

It is sometimes very very French.

I like a lot of the humour of the first seasons. My favourite running gag is probably nobody being able to see the Lady of the Lake but Arthur, leading to a lot of confusion when he's talking to her while other people are also there. It's not humourous, but I'm really fond of Guenièvre being friends with Arthur's mistresses (Guenièvre/Demetra OTP, tbh).

I really like how the later seasons and the first ones too, but to a lesser extent, deal with themes of power and kingship. What makes a great king/leader is that "Ils ne se battent que pour la dignité des faibles." (They fight only for the dignity of the weak.) which yeah. Okay.

There are a lot of really fun episodes -- including one where Perceval goes through a dimension door to Tatooine and steals Luke's ROTJ lightsaber (Arthur makes him put it back) -- but my favourite is the one where they get super excited at the idea of killing a Roman, because the Romans are supposedly federating them, but it's cool if they tell Rome it wasn't them. (This turns out to be Arthur's buddy Caius.)
lb_lee: M.D. making a shocked, confused face (serious thought)
[personal profile] lb_lee
So, while researching our childhood neighborhood, we ran across an archive of the old neighborhood newsletter, going back to 2010.

Most of it is basically what we remember--babysitting, Lawn of the Month, classifieds, neighborhood events, water rationing and fire safety... and then there's some weird stuff.  Mostly of the "Suburban Gothic" variety, but some honestly just strange.  Skimming a year and a half of this newsletter for photos, I learned...
  • There are adults in our neighborhood who would chase teenagers in their car for knocking over trash cans.  And have a car chase with the kids until the cops came.  And then be called a superhero.
  • Somebody killed a deer with a crossbow.  And just... left the deer to run and die. (The newsletter reminded everyone that the neighborhood was not a hunting zone and to be nice to the animals.)
  • The turtles in the pond get blamed for everything.  Everything.
  • Somebody got murdered and their body got dumped in the park, but don't worry guys, he wasn't one of the neighbors!  The neighborhood remains safe!  It's all good! (The turtles were not responsible.)
  • People have very, VERY passionate feelings about who exactly is allowed to use the pool and basketball court. (The pool is now open to folks only with a keycard, which is just the strangest thing ever to me.  I mean, I understand that this is a thing that happens, but really, were there truly that many people sneaking into the pool for nefarious purposes?)
  • Texas is apparently God's country.
  • People really want those turtles GONE.  Nobody knows where they came from.  Nobody knows why their population skyrocketed so.  But nobody wants the turtles.  The turtles have taken over.  They're not even snappers or anything, just your usual red-ears, so I'm not sure what people's beef is with them.
I am left with the assurance that the Homeowners Association is just as strange a beast as I suspected.

Page generated Sep. 19th, 2017 03:23 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios